Fσrßærηe

はじめまして! I'm Daniel. I'm intelligent, talkative, kinda weird.
I love books, TV shows, movies, anime, art, music, all that jazz.
Thanks for visiting, and feel free to message me any time!

August 22, 2014 5:12 pm 3:36 pm August 21, 2014 8:48 pm
rangerkimmy:

driftingfocus:

Take note: this is how to properly disarm someone. Always go to the outside of the arm, not the inside.

ah yes I have been doing it wrong the whole time it seems cowering in fear was not the first step

Just want to share a few quick thoughts.
Trained individuals might know to hold their pistol at their hip specifically because holding it out, while easier to aim, makes them more easily capable of being disarmed, especially at close distances such as that. But then again, most people aren’t trained individuals.
Like the previous comment said, go to the outside. Move your head first. But not only that, you have to rapidly turn your body to the side as you move to decrease the amount area that can be hit. Grab the wrist and turn it down to your hip so the gun points away from you. Bringing it to your hip unbalances the attacker and strengthens your control over the person. When you reach around the head to grab and twist the neck, cup your hands over the chin and twist not just to the side, but up as well. This forces a bend on the spine, which unbalances the attacker. Then you bring him down. Then, it’s a good idea to do a strike to the head if you’re fast enough (with the hand not holding the wrist), or you could drop a knee down onto the face. Whatever works.
I don’t really know all the details about taking the gun away. But first of all, a way to prevent the pistol from firing is to put your hand over the hammer, but this doesn’t always work, so you’d want to try to take the gun away. Of course, always make sure the gun is pointed away from you. To force the gun from the hands, you need to cause either an extension of the wrist flexors or forearm flexors (meaning bending the wrist forward or back really hard) by grabbing the gun and pulling it down. Fast. Do what you can, I guess. I dunno, break the elbow? Whatever.
Afterwards, keep the gun to make sure he doesn’t get back up to attack you again. Look for any other attackers while you cautiously exit the scene.

rangerkimmy:

driftingfocus:

Take note: this is how to properly disarm someone. Always go to the outside of the arm, not the inside.

ah yes I have been doing it wrong the whole time it seems cowering in fear was not the first step

Just want to share a few quick thoughts.

Trained individuals might know to hold their pistol at their hip specifically because holding it out, while easier to aim, makes them more easily capable of being disarmed, especially at close distances such as that. But then again, most people aren’t trained individuals.

Like the previous comment said, go to the outside. Move your head first. But not only that, you have to rapidly turn your body to the side as you move to decrease the amount area that can be hit. Grab the wrist and turn it down to your hip so the gun points away from you. Bringing it to your hip unbalances the attacker and strengthens your control over the person. When you reach around the head to grab and twist the neck, cup your hands over the chin and twist not just to the side, but up as well. This forces a bend on the spine, which unbalances the attacker. Then you bring him down. Then, it’s a good idea to do a strike to the head if you’re fast enough (with the hand not holding the wrist), or you could drop a knee down onto the face. Whatever works.

I don’t really know all the details about taking the gun away. But first of all, a way to prevent the pistol from firing is to put your hand over the hammer, but this doesn’t always work, so you’d want to try to take the gun away. Of course, always make sure the gun is pointed away from you. To force the gun from the hands, you need to cause either an extension of the wrist flexors or forearm flexors (meaning bending the wrist forward or back really hard) by grabbing the gun and pulling it down. Fast. Do what you can, I guess. I dunno, break the elbow? Whatever.

Afterwards, keep the gun to make sure he doesn’t get back up to attack you again. Look for any other attackers while you cautiously exit the scene.

(Source: deaglefifty, via malusdraco)

8:21 pm
kowasekai:


Ta ta tara-tta~ by tomozero

※Permission to upload this illustration was given by the artist.

kowasekai:

Ta ta tara-tta~ by tomozero

※Permission to upload this illustration was given by the artist.

(via ayanotateyuri)

8:20 pm

writerlyn:

wishuponastardis:

Special skills: extensive Harry Potter knowledge, can watch an entire TV show in a week, knows words to every Disney song, can form abnormally strong attachments to fictional characters, Microsoft Word

So you mean, able to retain knowledge, has incredible focus and drive, excellent at processing media, remembers obscure details when needed, and has great skill at creating connections with individuals despite minimal interfacing?

And Microsoft Word?

(via on-sparrows-wings)

8:08 pm 7:56 pm

*ahem* you can now draw on my blog so go nuts

7:13 pm
thehpalliance:

If you use YouTube, you need to know this.
You’ve heard all these rumblings about Net Neutrality over the past several months. Let’s get real: this is about controlling online video. It is estimated that by 2017, video content will account for 80-90% of all global Internet traffic.
This isn’t just about not being able to binge-watch a series on Netflix. It’s about the future of online video as we know it.
Whether your YouTube channel is home to daily vlogs, short films, or just that one video from when the cinnamon challenge seemed like a good idea, you’re a video creator. Your content and comments help shape this community. Let’s keep it that way.
Net Neutrality means that your YouTube videos reach people at the same speed as clips from last night’s episode of the Tonight Show. It means a level playing field for video creators looking to reach an audience. But new Net Neutrality rules could mess that up.
Here’s the deal: Telecommunications companies already charge us to access the Internet through our homes and our phones. New FCC rules could allow them to also charge content providers (like YouTube, Netflix, and even PBS) for access to our eyeballs. It could create a fast lane for Jimmy Fallon’s clips, and slow lane for your YouTube videos.
It is really important that the FCC understands that online video creators care about Net Neutrality. Even if you’ve only ever uploaded ONE VIDEO, you are a creator and you have a voice.
If you can, please add your channel to our petition. We’ll deliver this to the FCC in September and demonstrate that the online video community cares about this issue. 
Sign the petition, then spread the word.

thehpalliance:

If you use YouTube, you need to know this.

You’ve heard all these rumblings about Net Neutrality over the past several months. Let’s get real: this is about controlling online video. It is estimated that by 2017, video content will account for 80-90% of all global Internet traffic.

This isn’t just about not being able to binge-watch a series on Netflix. It’s about the future of online video as we know it.

Whether your YouTube channel is home to daily vlogs, short films, or just that one video from when the cinnamon challenge seemed like a good idea, you’re a video creator. Your content and comments help shape this community. Let’s keep it that way.

Net Neutrality means that your YouTube videos reach people at the same speed as clips from last night’s episode of the Tonight Show. It means a level playing field for video creators looking to reach an audience. But new Net Neutrality rules could mess that up.

Here’s the deal: Telecommunications companies already charge us to access the Internet through our homes and our phones. New FCC rules could allow them to also charge content providers (like YouTube, Netflix, and even PBS) for access to our eyeballs. It could create a fast lane for Jimmy Fallon’s clips, and slow lane for your YouTube videos.

It is really important that the FCC understands that online video creators care about Net Neutrality. Even if you’ve only ever uploaded ONE VIDEO, you are a creator and you have a voice.

If you can, please add your channel to our petition. We’ll deliver this to the FCC in September and demonstrate that the online video community cares about this issue.

Sign the petition, then spread the word.

(via fishingboatproceeds)

4:34 pm 4:31 pm
frozendailydose:

tangleddailydose:

eyes-like-hers:

deepr:

cattart:

hazelbuttz:

hazelbuttz:

Shout out to Carlos Benavides, the coffee guy for the animators of Disney’s Frozen


You go, Carlos.

fan base for carlos

Carlos rocks

die hard Carlos fan right here

Carlos 5ever

We love you, Carlos

frozendailydose:

tangleddailydose:

eyes-like-hers:

deepr:

cattart:

hazelbuttz:

hazelbuttz:

Shout out to Carlos Benavides, the coffee guy for the animators of Disney’s Frozen

You go, Carlos.

fan base for carlos

Carlos rocks

die hard Carlos fan right here

Carlos 5ever

We love you, Carlos

(Source: icedcrappsupreme, via beneaththefells)